Books

Read to look inside, to expand your mind, open doors and change directions.

Nothing particularly earth shattering here, but this page contains a list of books that I have enjoyed enough to comment on and recommend. As a kid I hated to read and fought it tooth and nail. Being the son of a Philosophy PhD (dad) and a Geriatric Nurse Practitioner (mom), not reading was not an option. I can vividly recall many a weekend where I was not permitted to leave the house on an adventure until I had read a book or portion thereof and written a decent book report. Like many things, times changed when there was no longer a requirement to read and was done merely out of interest and enjoyment. I love reading, love the quite and introspection that comes with it. I’m not much for novels, no drama to speak of, but to learn and improve is fascinating. I hope some of these are of interest and value to you. – I’ll go back and pull up ones from prior years, these are of a few from recent days.


Currency Wars: The Making of the Next Global Crisis

Very interesting! Read it.


The Real Crash: America’s Coming Bankruptcy – How to Save Yourself and Your Country

Also very interesting, especially these days!


Thought Revolution: How to Unlock Your Inner Genius

Interesting concept, a little hard to implement all of the time.


The Long Earth

I figured I would throw a little bit of fiction into the library. This was an interesting book.


Road Rules: Be the Truck. Not the Squirrel. Learn the 12 Essential Rules for Navigating the Road of Life

Really, really good book. Well worth the time, not a long or difficult read.


Awesomely Simple: Essential Business Strategies for Turning Ideas Into Action

Super A-plus book! Highly recommend the book and following John as well, he posts and shares a lot of excellent content from himself as well as many others.


Mastering the Rockefeller Habits: What You Must Do to Increase the Value of Your Growing Firm

Every business owner that truly cares about their company more than profits exclusively should read this and try to implement it. It takes time, but it is well worth it.


Good to Great: Why Some Companies Make the Leap… and Others Don’t


The End of Growth: Adapting to Our New Economic Reality

Recommendation from my father, very interesting book, something to read and absorb for sure.


Dealing with Darwin: How Great Companies Innovate at Every Phase of Their Evolution


Atlas Shrugged

No need to explain this one, it has been around a long time and everyone interprets it a bit differently. Enjoy.


Who: The A Method for Hiring

Recommended by some friends in EO when discussing hiring challenges and finding ‘A” players for the company. This book provides a lot of excellent methods, processes and techniques for finding, interviewing, screening, selling and integrating only ‘A’ players. Identifying the very real need for only ‘A’ players, noting which on your team are not on the ‘A’ team and developing a plan to resolve that problem is one of many keys to success. This book will help.


Blink: The Power of Thinking Without Thinking

I love reading this sort of stuff, so fascinating. In everything you do, every encounter, every decision, you have more often than not made up your mind and done so with sound reasoning well before you figure it out consciously and unfortunately this is when conscious thought can and does steer us wrong. Fantastic book, well worth the time to read.


Win: The Key Principles to Take Your Business from Ordinary to Extraordinary


The Great Disruption: Why the Climate Crisis Will Bring On the End of Shopping and the Birth of a New World

This book was excellent though not the most uplifting and certainly not an ‘easy’ read. Each chapter and each line therein is eye-opening and thought-provoking. It is a shame more have not read this and acted or would even read it and not fall into denial. Looking back over time, I’m no better than any other contributor to the problem(s) though I am willing to heed a warning and make changes going forward. Stop your overly busy schedule and read this book, it may save your life inside and out.


The Art of War

Timeless classic and plenty of sound strategic advice for business life and war.


Rework


Double Double

Excellent book written by a fellow EO member, Cameron Herold. Plenty of good advice in every chapter, many of them eye opening opportunities to really improve your business and help take it to the next level. I would recommend reading this if you are prepping to start a business or are already moving down that path and are experiencing some of the growing pains and ups/downs of an entrepreneurial life.


Your Brain at Work: Strategies for Overcoming Distraction, Regaining Focus, and Working Smarter All Day Long

Fantastic book! Provides a great deal of insight into how your brain works, its limitations, how to rope it in and take control when focus, efficiency and effectiveness are required. I would highly recommend that anyone interested in being successful or more successful should read this book.


The Bedside Baccalaureate: A Handy Daily Cerebral Primer to Fill in the Gaps and Refresh Your Knowledge

One page nuggets, interesting learning…


Super Freakonomics: Global Cooling, Patriotic Prostitutes, and Why Suicide Bombers Should Buy Life Insurance

Follow up to the earlier book similarly titled.


Harvard Business Review on Managing People

Handy reference and some interesting ideas to try and use. This is a good book for those recently promoted or placed into a position of management where prior experience is limited.


Made to Stick: Why Some Ideas Survive and Others Die

Interesting book, certainly some good ideas and opportunities.


The Dip (Seth Godin)

Excellent book, I read it a couple of times and took away plenty – as with most of Seth’s books. Highly recommended.


The Tipping Point: How Little Things Can Make a Big Difference

An excellent book but found each section to become quite redundant, kind of like beating a dead horse. It could have been a far shorter book with the same excellent take-aways.


The Essays of Warren Buffett: Lessons for Corporate America

This has been a fantastic collection of Mr. Buffett’s writings. Each section of this book has been filled with experiences and wisdom, lessons learned and pitfalls to avoid. Lots of good stuff.


The Millionaire Next Door

So many more should read this book and incorporate it vigorously into their daily lives, not only relative to personal finance management but also to be read as a parent. Too many children these days are being setup for complete failure later in life. It’s never too late to make changes and improvements.


The E-Myth: Revisited

I’ve read this one a couple of times  and each time find many excellent concepts to be taken away and integrated into business thoughts and actions. Well worth your time.


How the Irish Saved Civilization

Currently reading … At the recommendation of my father … UPDATE… Ok, I didn’t make it through this one yet, maybe another day :)


The 4-Hour Work Week:

When the book first came out a couple of years ago, I looked down on it and thought it was arrogance and circumstance, certainly nothing I could pull off, especially with the huge pile of work I had on my plate. That being the point, I should have read it a couple of years ago. While a four hour work week may not be exactly what I or anyone else will end up with, it certainly offers a lot of to think about and in inspirational in making some major changes in my professional and my personal life. Again, a quick read, well worth the time.


The Last Lecture:

A bit of downer in some respects but a good book nonetheless. The intention of encouraging others to live now since tomorrow may be at or near the end is always a good reminder for anyone, especially someone caught up in today’s fast pace and over complicated lives. So the lecturer has been diagnosed with terminal cancer and wants to leave a lasting message and set of memories for his young children and does this by way of his last lecture (which was filmed) as well as the book. A very quick read and well worth the time, especially if you utter the words “I don’t have time” once or more times per week. If you “don’t have time” to read the book, maybe you should slow down and take inventory of life.


Outliers: The Story of Success

It’s good to see that there are some many with the aptitude for greatness, simply unfortunate that they are dealt a deck of cards, acceptable to the masses, that will hinder or even prevent them from achieving any sort of greatness. Very inspirational book, thought provoking and amazingly sad to see how likely it is that true talent, genius and skill is squandered based on cultural and socioeconomic trends and patterns. Like many others, I’m lucky.


Strengths Finder 2.0: Discover Your Strengths

A review of discussion of personality characteristics that help define how you think, act, communicate and behave in particular circumstances. The main point taken away, aside from the analysis of the self, is that most of us spend so much time trying to get better at things we don’t do very well instead of putting our effort into being the best at the things we already do well. How important is it that you ignore your strengths to build up your weaknesses?


The Ten-Day MBA

Maybe it was me, maybe the system, my teachers or just the timing, but college didn’t seem to be for me back in the ’90s. When getting started with running businesses, this book provided some knowledge of value and helped to point out areas where a business owner or CEO should make sure to pay attention to and focus effort or staff’s effort. This is certainly a good read for anyone who is running a business, starting a business or those looking for business knowledge without getting the degree.


Law of Connection

Given to me by my wife, this book deals with each person’s ability to communicate with others and how to break down others’ communication characteristics so-as to connect with them even if they have a different method of delivering and processing information. Seems to make a fair amount of sense and was interesting to break apart friends, colleagues and co-workers into their respective styles to see why some are better fits and more easy to work with. Having to filter and modify when communicating with someone else certainly has the ability to disrupt it if not making it completely undesirable and unrewarding. I’m a D.


The Go-Giver: A Little Story About a Powerful Business Idea

A parable detailing one way to greatness that all are capable of given the desire and hard work. I used to complain from time to time that I never got any letters in the mail (when I was 10). My mother always repeated the same thing, “If you want to get a letter in the mail, you have to write one first.” Just like anything else in life, there is only one way to pull a cart with a horse and that is to put the horse first and the cart second. To try in any other order is a recipe for failure. This is a great reminder of a notion that should be a common sense.


Little Gold Book of YES! Attitude

I’m a big fan of improving from within and earning what you get. This is a quick and easy read with barely a page that does not contain some nugget of value. You can have power, money, intelligence, looks and charm up the wazoo, but if you have a poor attitude, you are wasting all that you have and squandering your own potential to achieve success and improve the collective good. For the few minutes it takes to read this book and the few dollars it costs to buy and share, it should make your list. Gitomer has a bunch of other great books that are just simple, easy reads with page after page of common sense reinforcement.


The Long Tail

If you are involved in online retail in any capacity, this is a good book for you to read. I’ve witnesses and benefited from this concept several times and continue to reap its rewards as I type this. Your store has been opened, by way of the internet, to millions of unique customers with individual tastes. Catering to that with the idea of selling a few to many versus many to a few goes a long way.


The Great Depression: America 1929-1941

I picked this book up back in 2001 when I was actively involved in the stock market, writing intra-day trading strategies for technical swing trading and authoring a newsletter on the economic issues of the time. My intent was to clean from this book and many others which businesses thrived during the Great Depression as most economic indicators at the time pointed to a serious depression being right around the corner. We should have dropped below 7,300 in 2002 and reset the system then instead of dragging it out and deepening the wounds for another 6 years.


Mind Hacks: Tips & Tricks for Using Your Brain

A large collection of mental, visual and auditory hacks to fool or train your brain into functioning properly, differently or in a manner which you control. Broken into 100 functions no more than a few pages each. Close to perfect for today’s average attention span. Worth reading, just for the understanding nature of it.